5 ways to get wet in Far North Queensland

Far North Queensland is a water lovers paradise. From waterfalls, rivers and swimming holes to the ocean and the Great Barrier Reef, there are plenty of ways to cool off and get wet in the tropics. Some are adrenaline-fuelled, others are relaxing as floating.

Here are the top five ways to get your water fix when visiting Far North Queensland.

Diving the Great Barrier Reef

Diving on the Great Barrier Reef. Photo Credit: queensland.com

Spend five hours on the Great Barrier Reef with Calypso Reef Cruises and visit three different Agincourt ribbon reef sites. Departing from Port Douglas, Calypso offers a smooth ride to the outer reef for an exhilarating day of fun, discovery, and adventure in the natural wonderland of the Great Barrier Reef. You’ll have access to explore three stunning and exclusive reef sites at the renowned Agincourt ribbon reefs, each chosen for visual and ecological diversity for your dive and snorkel adventures. The boat offers snorkelling and diving from beginners to experienced and certified divers. As an added bonus during the whale season, Calypso has one of the few permits available from the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority that allows guests to swim with dwarf minke whales if encountered – a truly unforgettable experience.

Snorkel down a river

Snorkel down a river with Back Country Bliss. Photo Credit: Back Country Bliss

There is no better way to stay cool in the hot tropics than to get in the water. However, while most people think of swimming and snorkelling on the reef, there is another option – river snorkelling with Back Country Bliss. Within an ancient rainforest, step into the cool, crystal-clear water and drift with the current as you explore life under the water’s surface. Watch fish dart in and around the river stones and keep your eyes out for the occasional turtle or even an eel. This family friendly tour is the perfect introduction to snorkelling before heading out to the reefs. Small children (and adults) can journey down the river on large river sleds. Then, just lay back on your mat and enjoy the serenity of the beautiful surroundings. This is an amazing eco-immersion adventure that’s different every time.

White water rafting

Get wet and wild on Tully River. Photo Credit: Raging Thunder

Home to the 2019 World Rafting Championships, the Tully River offers plenty of thrills and adrenaline pumping action. Tackle the rapid waters on a white-water adventure of a lifetime. Conquer grade 3 and 4 rapids on a wild ride through a spectacular gorge surrounded by World Heritage rainforest. This one will be sure to get the adrenaline pumping.

Chase waterfalls

Millaa Millaa Falls. Photo Credit: Supplied

The number of waterfalls in Far North Queensland is astounding and in wet season they really come alive. Thanks to the high rainfall (up to 8m per year), powerful rivers and steep escarpment country of this region, there are waterfalls aplenty here. These falls are fed by a plethora of streams that run off the surrounding high peaks and are often situated in picture-perfect locations, with fantastic swimming holes. Some to note are Millaa Millaa Falls, Josephine Falls, Nandroya Falls , Wallicher and Tchupala falls.

Spot wildlife on the Daintree River

Solar Whisper river cruise – Photo Credit: Kate Webster

Ok so this one is not getting wet as such, but time on the river. Cruise the Daintree River (Julaymba) with Solar Whisper, spotting wildlife on a quiet clean solar electric boat “Solar Whisper”. Get closer to nature where you can hear, smell and experience without noise and fumes. Know that you have enjoyed seeing crocodiles and other wildlife without having any impact on it. Solar Whisper has a 99% success rate for spotting crocodiles, excellent birding opportunities and other wildlife possibilities such as snakes, frogs, crabs and fish. Your experienced interpretive guide is accustomed to the nuances of the river, rainforest and mangroves and can spot an incredible variety of wildlife that you would not necessarily see on your own. The boat is fitted with the unique “CROC CAM” to help show well-camouflaged crocodiles and wildlife.

Kate Webster is a world traveller, ocean lover and conservation warrior who is determined to make every moment count for not only herself, but the world around her. An editor and travel journalist, Kate travels the globe in search of vivid imagery and compelling stories that capture the essence of the people and places she visits. She is a passionate conservation advocate, sustainable traveller and always travels with reason and cause.

kate@capturedtravel.com